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How To Install Panel Fencing

Choosing Fence Panels | Options for Timber Buildings | How to Install Panel Fencing | Assembling Timber Buildings | How to Guides

A step-by-step guide to installing panel fencing on timber or concrete posts.

Tools Required

  • String line
  • Spirit level
  • Hammer
  • Grafter or spade
  • Shovel holer
  • Tape measure
  • Saw

Fixings Required

  • Panel clips
  • 40mm galvanised nails

Step 1

Ensure the area is clear from obstructions such as old fence posts, bushes, or anything that may interfere with the new fence line.

Step 2

Check all underground services. The area must be clear of pipes and cables for at least two feet underground. Erect the string line to mark the fence boundary.

Step 3

Select your concrete or timber post.

Step 4

Digging a two foot deep hole
Step 4  Digging a two foot deep hole.

Dig a two foot deep hole and insert post.

Step 5

Putting a post in
Step 5  Putting a post in.

Ensure that the post is the correct height for the fence, allowing for gravel boards if used. Use a spirit level to make sure the post is upright. Put Rapid Set Post Kwik into the hole, add the correct amount of water and mix.

Attaching panel clips

Step 6

Step 6  Attaching panel clips.

Concrete slotted posts do not require panel clips. For wooden posts attach the panel clips to the posts and then fix the panels to the clips. Keep a spirit level on top of the panel to make sure the fence remains level on top.

Step 7

Repeat steps 4, 5 and 6 until all your panels are installed. The last panel may need to be reduced in width to finish off the gap. This can be done with a handsaw.

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Choosing Fence Panels

Choosing Fence Panels | Options for Timber Buildings | How to Install Panel Fencing | Assembling Timber Buildings | How to Guides

Here are some fairly basic things to consider when thinking of buying a new fence.

The old adage good “fencing makes good neighbours” may be true but it must surely be wise to tell your neighbours what you would like to do. When they realise that they will benefit from having the new fence themselves they will probably be enthusiastic.

Number of panels and posts required

Waney lapped panelMeasure the length of the proposed new fence line. As a rule your new panels will be about six feet wide, so divide the length of your fence in feet by six to get the number of panels you need. For example, for a fence 48 feet long you will need eight panels. You will probably want new posts  eight panels will need nine posts if you want posts at both ends.

Types of post

jarrett-post3.jpg Concrete Slotted PostYou have a choice between the strength and longevity of concrete posts and the natural appearance of wooden posts. For wooden posts you have a choice of two sizes, 4 inch square or the cheaper 3 inch square. You also have a choice of post caps.

Using gravel boards underneath the fence panels is a good way of ensuring that your panels will not rot prematurely. Both wood and concrete gravel boards are available.

Remember, your fence is only as good as your posts, so if you opt for one of the more expensive panels use the appropriate posts.

Methods of securing posts

spike-long.jpgThere are two methods of securing your posts into the ground. One is to concrete them in, the other is to use metal post anchors. Metal post anchors are only suitable for wooden posts. Choose the correct length of post for the job. If you are concreting them in the posts will need to be 2 ft longer than the height of the fence. If you use metal post anchors the posts will not need to be as long.

Fitting Panels to Posts

For wooden posts fix the fence panels to the posts using panel clips to avoid splitting the wood. Concrete slotted posts do not need fixings – the panels slot straight into the posts.

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Fencing and building tools

Jarrett fencing have a wide range of fencing tools to sell to the DIY enthusiast for all types of garden projects, such as panel fencing,  closeboard fencing, chainlink fencing, trellis, gates,  sheds, posts and garden structures.

Please view our DIY guides for extra help and guidance.

We can deliver nationwide. Please view our delivery page for costings and information.

Please feel free to contact us if you have any concerns about installing any fencing. We have a vast history and knowledge of all aspects of fencing, and would be pleased to help.

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Guide to installing closeboard fencing

Closeboard Fencing
Closeboard Fencing

Traditional closeboard bay fencing is built in-situ and is very strong. It is especially good for gardens with sloping ground because the fence can be erected to follow the ground contours, which means fence stepping is not needed.

The mortised posts and the gravel boards can be either timber or concrete. Traditional closeboard bay fencing with concrete mortised posts and concrete gravel boards is the strongest of domestic garden fences.

Step 1: Fixing the posts

All posts should be concreted 2ft deep in the ground using post mix, with the mortised holes in line with the boundary line.

Step 2: Fixing the arris rails

The posts have mortised holes to allow shaped arris rails to fit inside of posts.

Step 3: Fixing the gravel boards

For timber posts and gravel boards measure from the top of the post down 1.65 metres and nail the timber gravel board cleats in the centre of each post. Cut the length of the gravel board to fit between the posts and nail to the cleats.

For concrete posts and gravel boards use the 2-pin cleat kit. The cleats have two prongs on one side, which slide into the pre-drilled holes in the concrete posts, and a pre-drilled hole in the other side through which it is bolted to the concrete gravel board. The concrete gravel boards have short slots at either end to allow the bolt to pass through.

Step 4: Fixing the centre stump

For timber posts and gravel boards dig an 8-inch deep hole in the centre of the fence bay and insert the centre stump with the angled top facing up to fit under the bottom arris rail. Back fill earth around the stump and nail the timber gravel board to the stump.

For concrete posts and gravel boards dig a 8-inch deep hole in the centre the of fence bay, in line with the pre-drilled hole in the concrete gravel board, and insert the centre stump with the angled top facing up to fit under the bottom arris rail. Back fill earth around the stump and bolt the concrete gravel board to the stump through the pre-drilled hole.

Step 5: Fixing the featheredge boards

Starting from the left of the fence bay sit the first featheredge board on top of the gravel board, with the fat edge towards the post, and nail it to the arris rails. Take the second board, overlap it by one inch on the first board – again with the fat edge towards the post – and nail it to the arris rails. Repeat until the bay is complete, always with the fat edge towards the post and the thin edge overlapping by one inch.

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Guide to installing panel fencing

A step-by-step guide to installing panel fencing on timber or concrete posts.

Tools Required

  • String line
  • Spirit level
  • Hammer
  • Grafter or spade
  • Shovel holer
  • Tape measure
  • Saw

Fixings Required

  • Panel clips
  • 40mm galvanised nails

Step 1

Ensure the area is clear from obstructions such as old fence posts, bushes, or anything that may interfere with the new fence line.

Step 2

Check all underground services. The area must be clear of pipes and cables for at least two feet underground. Erect the string line to mark the fence boundary.

Digging a two foot deep hole
Step 4 - Digging a two foot deep hole
Putting a post in
Step 5 - Putting a post in
Attaching panel clips
Step 6 - Attaching panel clips

Step 3

Select your concrete or timber post.

Step 4

Dig a two foot deep hole and insert post.

Step 5

Ensure that the post is the correct height for the fence, allowing for gravel boards if used. Use a spirit level to make sure the post is upright. Put ‘Rapid Set Post Kwik’ into the hole, add the correct amount of water and mix.

Step 6

Concrete slotted posts do not require panel clips. For wooden posts attach the panel clips to the posts and then fix the panels to the clips. Keep a spirit level on top of the panel to make sure the fence remains level on top.

Step 7

Repeat steps 4, 5 and 6 until all your panels are installed. The last panel may need to be reduced in width to finish off the gap. This can be done with a handsaw.